Making Responsible Choices – Organic Coconut Oil

When it comes to choosing coconut oil these days, the selection seems endless. Over the last decade, coconut oil has become a multi-million-dollar industry and it’s projected to keep growing. In 2017, the global virgin coconut oil market was valued at $650 million USD, [1] and in 2016 approximately 456,000 metric tons of coconut oil were consumed by the US alone. [2]

With this popularity comes mass production which can have negative effects on the planet, its people, and the quality of the product you consume. Large scale farming practices can lead to soil nutrient depletion, increased use of pesticides, deforestation, and diminished biodiversity as well as hardship for local farmers and their livelihoods. [3] Choosing organic, fairly-traded, and sustainably-farmed coconut oil is key to the health of all.

Factory Made vs. Organic Fair Trade

As with all foods, fresh is best and coconut oil is no different. However, due to high demand, most coconut oil is now mass-produced and plantation-farmed. This method usually means the coconuts are mechanically harvested, husked, and stored for days before being transported to the factory for further processing. Over the course of up to two weeks, the coconuts are machine ground, pressed, and later filtered before the final product is ready to be shipped to the retailer. This process allows a lot of time for mould growth and degradation of the oil to take place, along with loss of vital nutrients.

There is an alternative. The Direct Micro Expelled® (DME) technique  is a revolutionary process that delivers quality, indigenous, raw, and fresh coconut oil. Alpha DME Organic Virgin Coconut Oil is obtained from wild-crafted and handpicked coconuts that are husked, shredded, and pressed – all by hand – within 90 minutes of harvesting.

The coconuts used in this process are exclusively sourced from the Solomon Islands where local farmers grow and hand press the coconuts directly on their own family farms, where fair working conditions and fair trade are ensured. Alpha’s certified organic standards also mean no harmful chemicals are used in the process. The result is a fresh, high-quality, nutrient-dense, and sustainable coconut oil unlike any other on the market that also supports the local economy and indigenous peoples of the islands.

Benefits and Uses of Organic Fair Trade Coconut Oil:

With its many uses and benefits, it’s no wonder coconut oil has hit the Fats Hall of Fame. Here are just a few reasons to use it and why it’s so wonderful:

  • Benefits the local farmers, environment, and economy – organic and fair trade farming practices support a healthy and sustainable future for Solomon Islanders.
  • Benefits the health of the farmers and those consuming the final product – no harmful chemicals are used in any step of the process.
  • Makes the ideal cooking oil – as a heat-stable and healthy saturated fat, it’s the perfect choice for high-heat applications including frying, sautéing, and baking.
  • Supports weight management – the medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) in coconut oil provide a source of easily used energy and great support for ketogenic diets and blood sugar balance.

Checklist for a Responsible Choice

To make the most responsible choice as a consumer and to get the best quality coconut oil, look for the following features:

  • Certified fair-trade
  • Organic
  • Fresh
  • Raw
  • Cold-pressed
  • Virgin
  • Sustainably grown and harvested

Alpha DME Organic Virgin Coconut Oil delivers an award-winning, high quality, raw coconut oil unlike any other on the market. With its many uses and benefits, it’s a sustainable, sound choice for supporting the health of your body, the environment, and the future of the farmers growing the product. To learn more about Alpha DME, visit alphahealth.ca/about-us/.

References:

[1] industrytoday.co.uk/chemicals/virgin-coconut-oil-market-will-reach-780-million-us–by-the-end-of-2025–growing-at-a-cagr-of-2-3-

[2] statista.com/statistics/288367/coconut-oil-consumption-united-states/

3 Rist, L. Feintrenie, L. Levang, P. (2010 April). The Livelihood Impacts of Oil Palm: Smallholders In Indonesia. Biodiversity and Conservation.19(4): 1009-1024.  Retrieved from:

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10531-010-9815-z

[3] Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

 Retrieved from:  www.fao.org/fileadmin/templates/rap/files/meetings/2013/Coconut.pdf